Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Hope in the Land

GIVEAWAY

NEWPORT, OLIVIA
HOPE IN THE LAND

When Henry Edison turns up in Lancaster County to survey farm women about their domestic contributions during the 1930s, the last thing Amish housewife Gloria Grabill has time for is the government agent's unending questions. Gloria's hands are already full with a farm to run alongside her husband, a houseful of children and extended family, and an English neighbour, Minerva Swain, who has been trying Gloria's patience for forty years. Gloria's oldest daughter, Polly, wants nothing more than the traditional path of an Amish farmer's wife, but everything she does seems to push Thomas Coblentz further away. As their lives entangle, Gloria digs deep to find the grace to see past Minerva's irritating habits to her unspoken fears, while Polly and Henry brave unforeseen shifts in their dream.

While the Great Depression shadows the country in gloom, can Amish and English neighbours in Lancaster County grasp the goodness that will sustain hope?

My Review:

This is one of those subtle kinds of stories that creeps into your heart. A hope-filled respite that left me longing for simpler days. Gloria is at the centre of it all, dispensing compassion and wisdom (most of the time) as she nurtures her brood and looks beyond the needs of her own family. Her one nemesis is Minerva and, frankly, I can totally see why! (insert the sound of nails scratching on a blackboard -- the woman is that annoying!)

I've always been fascinated by the Depression era as a historical setting though it isn't the most popular time periods for novels. The title, Hope in the Land, aptly describes how Gloria approaches life during these trying times and somehow she manages to spread that hope to those around her. And I love her counsel! "Find the calm in the storm. If you try to talk in the wind, you only end up shouting at yourself." (p.129)

Then there's Polly with her dreams of marriage though she isn't great farmwife material. City-slicker Henry, a fish out of water when he arrives in rural Lancaster County. And Minerva, the annoying English neighbor who puts on airs. Gloria touches all their lives in different ways. A gentle story of simple faith and endless hope.

GIVEAWAY OPPORTUNITY:

 If you would like an opportunity to win a copy of  Hope in the Land please leave a comment below or email me at kavluvstoreadATyahooDOTca. If you post a comment and add your email address, please use AT and DOT instead of @ and . in the address to protect yourself from spammers. If you enter the draw via email please remember to put the title in the subject line so that it's easy for me to spot your entry. Draw will be held and winner announced on Sunday July 31 2016. Offer open to international readers. Good luck!

22 comments:

  1. I hope I can visit Lancaster county some day. I know I would miss all my conveniences if I lived that way, but I love to read Amish books!
    pbclark(at)netins(dot)net

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    1. I love Amish fiction as well! Good luck, rubynreba.

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  2. I so want to read this book. Find the depression era fasinating. cheetahthecat1986ATgmailDOTcom.

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  3. I have not read any Depression era fiction, but this sounds interesting! Thanks for the review! lelandandbeckyatreagandotcom

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    1. It's fascinating to see how people coped. Good luck, Becky.

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  4. I enjoy reading Amish fiction books. This story sounds like an interesting one! d[dot]brookmyer[at]yahoo[dot]com

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    1. It really is because in the 1930s there wasn't a whole lot of difference between Amish and English farmers. Technology was just making its way to the wealthier farmers so this book really showcases the faith element and how each farm wife approaches the challenges of the time. Good luck, Donna.

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  5. I am fascinated by this time in history and I would love to read this book. Thank you for the opportunity, Kav!

    mauback55 at gmail dot com

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    1. You're welcome, Melanie. Good luck.

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  6. I get SO excited when I see a review for a new Amish fiction novel I haven't read! I also like the word, Hope, in the title, as that is what gets me through each day. I'd love to read this book, as I am interested in the Great Depression as well. My favorite television program, The Walton's, takes place during this time period. Thanks for the chance!
    Susan in hot North Carolina
    susanlulu@yahoo.com

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    1. Oh, that's funny, because as I read this book I kept thinking about the Waltons and expecting John Boy to meander on down the road. LOL It definitely has that kind of vibe, so you'll enjoy this read. Good luck, Susan.

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  7. I haven't read many Depression era books so the time period appeals to me, and I love Amish books so I'm adding this book to my TBR list. Thanks Kav!
    Dblaser(at)windstream(dot)net

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    1. It's a fascinating time period, I think. Plenty of scope for the imagination as far as novel writing is concerned. Good luck, Diane.

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  8. I'm so drawn to this book because of the cover! Most of the Amish stories I've read are from modern times.
    Dianna

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  9. Sounds like a very interesting book. I would especially like to read an Amish book during the 1930s, it's different from other Amish fiction books. Thank you for the chance to win a copy.
    kmgervais(at)nycap(dot)rr(dot)com

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    1. Yes -- the time period is a refreshing change. Good luck.

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  10. I really enjoy Olivia's books so would be thrilled to win a copy of this book, thank you for the chance.

    wfnren at aol dot com

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    1. You're welcome, Wendy. Good luck.

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  11. Ode to the power of your reviews! I had seen this book, but it didn't catch my eye until you mentioned it's time in history. I hadn't even realized that it was historical fiction. The 30's are my absolute favorite time in history to read about. I think is stems from my love for my grandmother, Sadie (my daughter's namesake.) I enjoyed listening to her recall her childhood and early married years during the depression. I can still see and feel the effects of the depression on how my mom (one of 15 kids) raised us. It's nothing like the entitlement of today. My mom is still extremely frugal and one of the most money savvy people I know. It's good to be reminded of a time when basic needs being met was a blessing and not an entitlement. Kav, if you like this time in history, Bodie and Brock Thoene's Shiloh Legacy series and Shiloh Autumn are another wonderful choice. tlhcoupon(at)hotmail(dot)com

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    1. There is something in the way common struggles draw us together and think that's what appeals in this era. And the lessons they learned back then last a lifetime -- just like your mom's frugality. We need some of that sense of community and responsibility nowadays. I will definitely check out the Shiloh Legacy series. Thanks for the tip. Good luck, Terrill.

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